By 1990 enrolments stood at 391 students, which included 43 preps. There were 25 staff members. Importantly 1990 was the year that during Monday morning assemblies students first started reciting the school oath 'We are standing with friends we care for and respect. The flag reminds us that Australia is our home. We must do what we can to make it a fair and happy place for everyone'.

The Mothers' Club celebrated its 50th anniversary of its first official documented meeting. There had been a less formal Mother’s Group that had been assisting the school since the 1920s though. There is no doubt that the Mothers' Club had been integral to the school over the years, organising everything from fundraising activities, to school events and food for needy children during the war. 

The Footscray Football club visited the school in 1990 as part of The Care for Kids program, which aimed to encourage achievement, fair competition, social interaction, doing your best and avoiding violence. The soccer, tee-ball, netball, volleyball and cricket teams were also premiers in the local school competition. Cups of tea were available for parents after the Friday morning assemblies and up to 50 parents would generally attend. 

By 1991 enrolments had dipped further to 330 students and due to this a relocatable classroom was removed and taken to another school. This meant that two classes had to be split and the children were distributed across the other grades for the final term. Fundraising efforts included a chocolate drive, a Mother's Day stall, a end of year concert, a fete and a Lamington drive. A Macedonian night was held and the school also participated in an event at Footscray Football Ground to celebrate 100 years of Footscray being a city. The school again won the Footscray Citizens Beautification Award. 

In 1992 enrolments were at 300 students. TV personality Kevin Heinze visited the school this year and helped the students plant trees that were donated by the local Rotary club. Sporting success came again, when the soccer team and the Kanga cricket teams were premiers of the local competition. The annual school concert was held over two nights, with all the children performing. The staff item was Snow White and the Eight Dwarfs.

The school insignia in the early 1990s

The school insignia in the early 1990s

By 1993 enrolments continued to drop and only 250 children were enrolled. The old Commodore computers were sold off and the school started purchasing Macintosh computers. A Koori dance group visited the school and performed for the children and another Grandparent's Day was held. A mini-fete raised $2000 and a spell-a-thon raised $1200. The students and teachers collected enough Coles dockets to gain the school a free colour Macintosh computer. 

In 1994 enrolments were only 212 students. Unfortunately a continuous stream of children had left the school during the year, with most of those leaving for the newer areas of Werribee, Hoppers Crossing, Keilor, Sydenham and Melton. There were only 9 classes, with numbers of students varying in each class of between 18-30. During 1994 the first record of grades performing at the school assembly was noted. This is an incredibly popular tradition that still happens today. 

Aerial_1994.jpg

An Aerial Photo of the School

1994

The 75th anniversary of the school was celebrated on the 15th August 1994. Speeches were made by the Mayor Mr Ted Logan, the Principal Ms Kathe Ginnane and two guest speakers, Mr Fred Maddern and Mrs Esther Cox, who were both former pupils. Grade 6 students performed a historical item that involved singing, marching to drums and playing of musical instruments. The visitors were able to view a display of memorabilia and then go on a tour of the buildings and grounds. Souvenirs were available for purchase and these included pens, glasses and mugs. Graeme Hodgart, former student and current teacher, compiled an extensive history of the school and this was also sold for $10. Two hundred copies were distributed.

There’s a street where the feet are coming back to meet with their memories of KPS
Where the sugar gums are growing and Stony Creek is flowing    
Out in the mighty West! Where the teachers and children are continuing on  
Not forgetting the glories of the years that have gone
In their dreams it’s the same, they will go back there again, with their memories of KPS.

(written by Jack O’Hagan for the 75th birthday celebrations, 1994)

                                       

article about the 75th anniversary

article about the 75th anniversary

The first school charter for Kingsville as completed in 1995. During this year students collected Herald Sun ball bonanza tokens to win free sports balls for the school. Grades 3-6 enjoyed an excursion to Rickett's Point, while the younger grades visited a farm. A new adventure playground was introduced and fundraising events included a sausage sizzle, red nose day, a walkathon and Italian day.

In 1996 the school was plagued with an influx of mice. Thankfully Paul Grivas, the handyman and cleaner, took charge and managed to trap seventeen mice in one week and get rid of the remainder. The Footscray Football team continued their long association with the school and several of the players visited to talk to the students. A bus load of students and parents enjoyed a day at the MCG watching Footscray play Essendon. Children from grades 2-4 attended a football clinic at Yarraville Oval. The school fete was held and raised much needed money for the school. 

In 1997 the school adopted a new timetable, with teaching sessions being 9am till 11am, break from 11.am - 11.30am, teaching sessions from 11.30am to 1.30pm, lunch from 1.30pm-2.30pm and the final teaching session from 2.30pm - 3.30pm. This is the timetable we still use today. Student reports also changed in 1997 from being fully descriptive to outcome based. The yearly musical production was still very popular and due to the hard work of the organising teachers, Blagma Veljanoksa and Carolyn Withers, it was enjoyed by all. The Dental Unit was finally decommissioned in 1997 and converted into a parent's centre. Students needing dental work were driven by bus to a nearby government dental unit. Two star gazing nights, including the use of several telescopes, were held in 1997 that tied in with the Grades 4, 5, 6 discovering space study theme. Sun hats were made compulsory for the first time in terms one and four, with the slogan 'No Hat, No Play'.

School Production, 1998

School Production, 1998

By 1998 enrolment numbers had climbed to 226. The school's soccer team were district premiers and so were the open softball team. The Grade 3-6 camp was held at Camp Briars at Mount Martha, which included horse riding. On October 13th 1998 a fire at nearby Smorgon's necessitated the evacuation of the playground during lunch and the buildings were sealed for a short time. For the first time, children's birthdays were listed in the weekly newsletter. 

Enrolments had climbed to 240 students by 1999. A book fair enabled the school to gain $450 worth of books, while the Mother's Day stall raised almost $500. Parents participated in a shopping tour, a wine and cheese night and a music trivia night. The school concert was held over two nights and the netball and softball teams were local premiers. 

The school celebrated its 80th birthday in August 1999. Over one hundred visitors attended the celebrations, which included a whole school birthday party with a gigantic cake. A display of memorabilia was held in the hall and tours of the school were conducted by the Grade 5 and 6 students. 

Unknown source

Unknown source

 

the mail, 10th november 1999

the mail, 10th november 1999

80th anniversary celebration

80th anniversary celebration