The school was overcrowded by 1950 and two small grades had to work in the school corridors. A great deal of renovation was undertaken of the main building to make it more inhabitable. Cupboards were built under the blackboards in the infant rooms while repairs were made to the internal stairways. A new stairway was built at the north-west corner and the electric wiring was overhauled. By 1951 a new water supply was installed which helped immensely with the water taps and toilets. Enrolments had climbed to 734 so two pre-fabricated buildings had to built to ease the overcrowding. A temporary classroom was also set up in one of the corridors of the main building by erecting a screen across it.

By 1953 the number of students at the school had reached an incredible 886! Some grades had to be combined and were working in the school corridors. The school was extended to include the area behind the Bishop Street houses (now the oval). However many rocks had to removed and students often saw snakes sunning themselves in this area. For many years this area was known as Snake Gully. The snake problem was such an issue for the school that it even received a mention in The Argus, when a local dog 'Rocky' was made the school mascot after killing 17 snakes in the area around the school! It wasn't until 1957 when work was done at the back of the school to fill in water holes and clear tall grass that the snakes diminished.

The argus, 25/11/1954

The argus, 25/11/1954

The argus 04/01/1957

The argus 04/01/1957

In September 1953 a ‘Special Head Teacher’, Frank H. Jobling, took charge of the school. The inspector noted that ‘….his wide knowledge of school affairs and his balanced outlook are already making themselves felt in the school organization and management’. Marching was still a big feature and both the boys and the girls won the marching contests at the district sports. The girls team went on to take the Victorian State Title. The football team were premiers in 1953 of the local school competition.

In 1954 the Queen visited Melbourne. Even though she was not visiting the school, the flagpole was painted and one can imagine the flag was flying proudly that day. In 1954 a new classroom was built which housed an additional two classes. This helped somewhat with the overcrowding. The school football team was triumphant in 1954 and took out the schools state title.

In 1954 enrolment at the school hit an all time high of 1043 students! You can only imagine how crowded the corridors were then. The Mothers Group was still going strong and supported the school in many ways, such as fundraising to help purchase library books, music equipment and outdoor seating. The sporting success of the school continued with the boys being the District Champions of both football and cricket.

During the 1950s the school's Mothers Club staged many successful fairs, all which raised much needed funds for the school. Students participated in the fair by decorating bikes, prams and billy carts which were then judged. The Mothers Club was also responsible for organising working bees.

In 1956 various groups from the school travelled to the MCG to witness the Olympic Games. This was the first time that Australia had hosted the Olympic Games and it was a huge event for Melbourne. On the 4th July 1956 the school was presented with an American flag in celebration of the school's friendship with its sister city 'Kingsville' in Texas, USA. The school also received an award from the A.N.A for the most improved school garden. The prize was a landscape painting which you can see in the newspaper article below.

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As you can see by the newspaper article to the right, trucks were an issue even back in 1958. 

In 1959 the Headmaster was Mr James J. Ravenscroft. The District Inspector said ‘…the Headmasters organization is sound and he keeps in close touch with the work in the various sections of his school which functions effectively’.  The girls under 12 relay team did very well and won the Victorian Championship.

GIrls netball team, 1950s

GIrls netball team, 1950s

In 1957 more drinking taps were installed to help cope with the number of students. The first ever Kingsville Fair was held (a precursor to our well loved school fair today) and was a big success with over 100 pounds raised.

Wembley Primary School opened its doors in 1958 and as a result 88 Kingsville students transferred over. This meant enrolments at Kingsville dropped down to 900. The school was also painted in 1958 and a gramophone and records were purchased for school use.

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